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April 9th, 2015 @ 8:48 am by Muhammad Azeem

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xau-usdTrend is bullish in 1 hour time frame. The intraday support could be seen at the price level of 1178.37 level. Yesterday, the price of XAU/USD tried to rise sharply with a gap which looks like start of a bullish trend. As long as the flow of market remains up, I am interested to take buying trading opportunities. If bearish candlestick closes below 1178.37 critical support level then up trend is going to end. Hence, I might like to quit trading XAU/USD and redo the 1 hour chart analysis.

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March 23rd, 2015 @ 11:38 am by Muhammad Azeem

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xau-usdTrend is bullish in 1 hour time frame. The intraday support could be seen at the price level of 1159.42 level. Yesterday, the price of XAU/USD tried to rise and then fall which looks like start of a weak bullish trend. As long as the flow of market remains up, I am interested to take buying trading opportunities. If bearish candlestick closes below 1159.42 critical support level then up trend is going to end. Hence, I might like to quit trading XAU/USD and redo the 1 hour chart analysis.

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May 8th, 2010 @ 3:45 pm by Matt "NewstraderFX" Carniol

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*And Maybe For Paper Currency

The New Your Times published a very interesting chart the other day which outlines how deeply in debt the PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain) are: $3.889 trillion or 4.958 trillion euros at Friday’s exchange rate. Of that amount, $2.053 trillion or 2.617 trillion euros, is owed to Germany, France and Britain (or presumably, their commercial banks).

Meanwhile, the absurdity of the Greek “rescue” package will only serve to put the nation further into debt both in absolute terms and in percentage terms of its GDP.  As of 2009, Greece’s GDP was about $345 billion, which means its debt-to-GDP percentage was 68.4%. But with $136 billion of new debt (the EU-IMF rescue package) and with Greek GDP estimated to fall about 4% in 2010, the percentage of debt-to-GDP rises to over 112%.

In other words what we have here is round 2 of the debt crisis, which is defined as “which banks are exposed and by how much.” Round 1, as you’re probably aware of, occurred in September 2008 after Lehman Bros. was allowed to collapse. At that time, as now, no one knew exactly which banks were exposed or by how much (although it was generally known that the exposure was huge). As a result of the uncertainty, inter-bank lending rates (LIBOR) soared as banks refused to lend to each other, which naturally caused financial markets to freeze.

We’re already seeing the beginnings of this same scenario happen right now. On Friday, 3 month LIBOR (the cost of borrowing dollars for 3 months) climbed 5.5 basis points to 0.428%, the highest level since Aug. 17, 2009 and the biggest increase since Jan. 16, 2009. It also was the 13th straight gain in this “fear gauge.”

The spread between three-month Libor and the overnight indexed swap rate rose more than 6 basis points to 18.5 basis points, the most since Aug. 26 2009. The measure at one point ballooned to 364 basis points, or 3.64 percentage points, after the Lehman debacle.

According to Simon Johnson, former chief economist at the IMF and co-author of the new book 13 Bankers, the joint EU-IMF program has only a “small chance of preventing an eventual Greek bankruptcy.”

During the negotiations which occurred prior to the announcement of the Greek plan, The IMF floated an alternative scenario with a debt restructuring, but this was rejected by both the European Union and the Greek authorities. This is not a surprise; leading European policy makers are completely unprepared for broader problems that would follow a Greek “restructuring,” because markets would immediately mark down the debt (i.e. increase the yields) for Portugal, Spain, Ireland and even Italy.

The fear and panic in the face of this would be unparalleled: When the Greeks pay only 50% on the face value of their debt, what should investors expect from the Portuguese and Spanish? It all becomes arbitrary, including which countries are dragged down. Adding to the problems are that European structures are completely unsuited to this kind of tough decision-making under pressure.

So, where do you go as a trader? Certainly, in the face of what’s happening you want to be out of anything that looks risky, which means stocks and commodities. The dollar is likely to continue gaining in this situation because there’s no other paper currency which can serve as an alternative. But there is one other “currency” however: Gold.

In “normal” times, gold trends downward as the dollar gains and it rises when the dollar falls, which is what happened once the dollar began depreciating as stocks rose from Mar. 09 2009. But when panic sets in, as it did after Lehman collapsed on Sept. 15, 2008, gold appreciates along with the dollar. For example, from that day until stocks begin rising, gold went from $779 to $929 while EUR/USD went from 1.4242 to 1.2889.

Gold and the euro peaked in early December as traders first began speculating on European problems. But once the market started to better appreciate the full extent of the European debt crisis in early February, gold rose from a low of $1044 to reach $1207 even as EUR/USD fell from 1.3677 to Friday’s close on 1.2750.

I would look for this trend to continue, because what’s going to happen is either one of two things: Debt restructuring or the far more likely debt monetization by the ECB, which means that Europe’s Central bank will be printing a lot more euros in order to buy the debt of the PIIGS.

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May 4th, 2010 @ 11:26 am by Matt "NewstraderFX" Carniol

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The ECB has been running its printing presses overtime, and it now looks like the presses are going to be running 24/7. The debt of Europe is now being monetized, which basically means that if a country can’t pay what it owes-viola! The ECB will just print more.

Europe’s commercial banks have been able to take the Greek bonds it buys to the ECB and swap them for cash that the ECB prints. This is the indirect monetization system-literally the printing of new money to pay old debts. Before, the ECB’s policy was to accept Greek bonds as collateral for cash as long as at least one credit rating agency maintained an investment grade rating on Greece.

Some thought that the ECB would actually toughen their collateral rules in the wake of the debt crisis and make it more difficult (and expensive) for the banks to trade their bonds. But then came last week’s downgrade of Greek government debt to junk status by Standard & Poors. The ECB’s response? It actually relaxed its collateral rules and will now accept Greek debt no matter how low Greece’s credit rating goes.

No one knows exactly how much Greek debt has been bought by Europe’s commercial banks, because the numbers are not made public. Also unknown what would happen with this bond-for-cash- swaps should Greece ever default on its obligations. For example, can the ECB hold the banks accountable and force them to reverse these swaps (i.e. return the cash received from the ECB for Greek debt)?

Of course, the situation goes way beyond Greece because the implication that is that any country (Portugal, Spain, etc.) that finds it too difficult and expensive to sell bonds into the market will also have its debt monetized by the ECB. In other words, the ECB, with its relaxation of collateral rules, has basically announced that it will print as much money as necessary, or, as much as it can before people decide they’ve had enough and abandon the euro altogether.

We’re actually starting to see this already because the euro is declining not only against other paper currencies but against gold as well. In fact, all paper currencies have been, and will continue to, devalue relative gold.

I said last week that the euro is a doomed currency and that I expected to see it decline to the lower 1.20’s as the year progresses. With the ECB now on a dedicated mission to monetize the debt of Europe, what’s likely to happen is that my downward target will need to be adjusted.

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October 28th, 2007 @ 7:42 pm by Eugene Teplitsky

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This is a video summary of the Live Forex Trading Room session on October 26, 2007.

Today’s Summary, by Sunil Mangwani:

Lets go over the long term things first which we’ve been following. On the GBP/USD, we were looking for a breakout on the daily timeframe from a Bullish Flag Formation. Price has been moving with lots of upwards momentum, and so far has remained above the mid channel of the flag. We were expecting a breakout this week, but it has not yet taken place. We have a penetration, but not a close.

On the intraday timeframes we did have an indication that today we might not get the close that we are looking for, because we had a Bullish 1-2-3 Formation. As I always say, “give me a 1-2-3 formation, and I can give you the targets”. We plotted Fibonacci Expansions to determine our targets, and price was rejected at the 127 level, so we do expect some retracement. Today is just not the day for the breakout. Lets see how it goes. Monday we do expect strong upmoves on the GBP/USD. Read the rest of this entry »

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